Posts Tagged ‘design’

Focus on: Entryways

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

An entryway is a portal into your home, setting the tone for the rest of the interior. Although it is the first stop once you step inside, it is not always the first thing you think of when you begin your design process. Here are some things to consider that can help your entryway make a statement in your home. log home entrance

First Impression

One of the first questions to ask yourself when you begin is; what do you want your guest’s to see first when they step through your door? Do you want it to be a sweeping, uninterrupted view of the great room with repeating truss work overhead?  Or perhaps you would like their first impression to come from witnessing a great glass window prow framed in robust logs and overlooking a mountainous terrain. Entryway view

Flow

The fluidity of your home is very important and it starts at your front door. Your entry could flow right into the formal, intimate setting of a dining or sitting room. Or you may prefer the entry to continue into a hallway, separating rooms and showcasing art as it leads your visitors into a more informal environment like your main living space. Entry

Function

Your entryway does not have to be limited to a walkway; there are several features you can include to make it functional as well as inviting. The functionality of your entryway can be as simple as including a coat closet or you can make it interactive by including a sitting area where guests can stop to take their shoes off. Will you be building in an area that has harsh winter weather or heavy rain? Consider making that entry space work with the climate by turning it into a mud room where all of your winter jackets and rain boots can dry off without impacting the rest of the home.

PrecisionCraft’s Latest Campaign: Alternate Views

Thursday, November 7th, 2013

For years, PrecisionCraft’s realistic and detailed renderings have brought floor plan concepts to life for clients searching for the perfect design. While every client will resonate differently with each concept we display, we know that sometimes a plan can get overlooked simply based on perspective. As a result, we will be taking a fresh look at a few plans every month that may not have made it on your list of favorites to begin with. This month we focused on different viewpoints of three Appalachian style designs. Check out the newsletter now and see if you can recognize these plans by their alternate angles.

This is just the first installation in the Alternate Views campaign, so make sure to sign up to receive the rest of the series by email now.

Modifying Rustic Luxury™: The Telluride

Thursday, September 12th, 2013

Browsing through PrecisionCraft’s floor plan concepts, couples will find a wide variety of style ideas; from Adirondack to French Country, handcrafted to timber frame, and sprawling log home to cozy cabin. Much like the different styles and plans, our clients also come to us from various backgrounds, each desiring unique floor plans for their lifestyle. Today we look at the Telluride, and how it was modified to fit a client’s specific project goals.

The Telluride

The Telluride concept was designed as part of PrecisionCraft’s line of Rustic Luxury™ Log Cabins. The designs within this line were created to showcase how homeowners could still achieve the creative mountain-style look they were searching for, but at a more intimate square footage.

Comprised of milled walls, large handcrafted posts, and stone, the Telluride’s western style exterior creates a rugged cabin look that is perfect for a mountain retreat. At a little over 1,500 square feet, the floor plan has two full master suites within a more intimate layout without the feeling of crowding.

The Modified Telluride

Building on a lakefront property in Montezuma, Iowa, this client worked with M.T.N Design to retain the rugged look of the Telluride’s exterior as well as the interior layout. However, they added nearly 1,000 square feet of unfinished basement to the design. When complete, the basement will hold an additional bedroom suite as well as extra communal living space for visiting guests.

 

To learn more about the Telluride and other cabin style plans, visit our Rustic Luxury™ Log Cabins page.

Fireplaces – Where and Why

Thursday, January 17th, 2013

It is that time of year when the steady decrease in temperatures outside, only increases our urge to grab a cup of hot tea and get the fire blazing inside. But where do you envision yourself enjoying this crackling fire? In the past, the placement of a fireplace might have only made sense in a central living space, but today you can find fireplaces throughout the home. Here we offer a few fireplace arrangement ideas to help you stoke the fires of creativity.

Great Room Fireplace

Where Can You Put a Fireplace?

For centuries, fireplaces have played an important role in providing that warm ambiance that is so characteristic in wood homes. While the placement of fireplaces was once fairly limited to a communal area, now it is possible to place them wherever it makes sense for your lifestyle. Including fireplaces in spaces like bedrooms, studies, and lofts add a sense of comfort and warmth. Many European countries will also add hearth space to their kitchen; you might consider this as an option for your home as well.

Two-sided hearth

Taking Advantage of Chimney Placement

The logistics of your home’s overall design can also impact how and where you choose to put a fireplace. Many log or timber homes today include multiple fireplace designs that utilize the same chimney’s masonry system. When you work with your designer, see if there are areas of your floor plan where it would make sense to do this. Maybe you decide to have your great room fireplace connect to the same chimney system as the adjacent dining room or kitchen fireplace. Or if you have a loft space directly above the great room consider including a fireplace here.

Creating Outdoor Fireplaces

Patio Fireplace

The warm glow of a fire doesn’t have to be restricted to an indoor hearth or outdoor fire pit, including a fireplace in your outdoor living spaces is another option. Perhaps you have a gorgeous gazebo located on your property for outdoor cooking and dining, consider including a fireplace for those crisp fall nights. If you have a great patio setup just outside of your great room, you could also connect an outdoor fireplace to your great room’s chimney system. Speak with your designer to find out if these might be options for your project.

 

For more ideas for your fireplace design, check out PrecisionCraft’s Photo Gallery.

Including that Unique Element

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

When in the midst of the design process, people don’t usually think about all of the exciting elements that can be added beyond their home’s structure. From the trusses within the home, to the character posts adorning an entryway, there are several structural and non-structural accents to think about when you are looking for that extra something in your design.

Truss Work truss work

For many log and timber frame homes, it is not uncommon to see trusses in the interior living spaces. While these trusses are sometimes meant to bare weight and add to the structural integrity of the home, there is also the choice of adding decorative truss work to your design. Whether this is seen in a single log truss framed in the eaves of your entryway, or in a lighter design not meant to hold weight, there are plenty of options for adding unique flair to your home with custom log and timber trusses.

Character Posts

Cedar Posts

At PrecisionCraft we offer the choice of incorporating flared cedar character posts into your design. These posts provide a distinctive look that contrasts traditional Douglas fir logs. Whether they are used as a structural component of your home’s entrance, or they act as a bold, decorative statement for your view-facing porch, character posts showcase the raw and unique beauty of the wood that makes up your home. For those looking for a more rustic, mountain style for their design, character posts are a great addition for both structural and non-structural purposes.

Siding

Siding

Skirl Siding

 

Much like how a fresh coat of paint can change the appearance of a room, including wood siding on your home can also change the appearance of the exterior and give it a unique look. With a variety of different sidings available, this material offers unique ways to get that extra character in your design. For instance, the use of skirl siding is a popular choice for many home owners as it has a rough, raw appeal that looks hand-cut. Another likable choice is vertical board-and-batten siding.

Fireplaces

Outdoor Fireplace

A feature seen in many log and timber homes, fireplaces and their design are another great opportunity for adding a one-of-a-kind accent to a project. Whether your fireplace is comprised of stone and reaches floor-to-ceiling, it is a dual-sided structure that connects your master bedroom to the great room, or it is placed outdoors for the comfortable enjoyment of all four seasons, fireplaces are a good thing to consider when looking to add uniqueness to your home’s design.

Windows

Window Wall

Windows don’t have to be a function-only square in the side of your home; they can become a great accent or focal point in any space. For some people, they choose to use windows to encase their sun room, while others frame their breathtaking great room views in magnificent window walls. By working with your designer, you can discover ways to include windows of different shapes, sizes, and designs so that they are functional and add to the architectural distinctiveness.

 

For more examples of structural and non-structural accents you can include in your home’s design, take a look at our Flickr gallery.